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20110701
20110731
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KQED (PBS) 13
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
it operates, or its effects on the ground. but frontline has spent months traveling through afghanistan, investigating how this secret campaign is conducted, what it's doing to the taliban and al qaeda, and whether it can play a decisive part in ending the war. >> narrator: our journey begins in khost province, eastern afghanistan. this is where al qaeda trained some of the 9/11 hijackers. it's now the heartland of the haqqani network, a ruthless branch of the taliban insurgency responsible for some of the most vicious attacks of the war. over the past year, there's been a dramatic escalation of kill/capture missions here. we're with the soldiers of the 101st airborne division and their afghan counterparts. they've received intelligence that a wanted taliban leader is hiding out nearby. >> we're going after a mid-level insurgent here in the district. guy's name is gulab, this guy right here. he's an ied facilitator, kidnapper, just all-around bad guy. we're going to do an air assault on his compound. >> roger, we copy. ( helicopter blades whirring ) >> narrator: in khost and across the
, asked the taliban today. but even as he spoke those words on the second day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is what you can do when 10,000 british troops have been reinforced by 20,000 americans. so far, the british soldiers have not run into any opposition. usually when the insurgents see nato coming in strength, they retreat. but not always. so no one takes any chances. afghan police lead the searches. nato believes afghan candy -- afghans can deal with their own people better than foreign troops. by 2015, the idea is they will do it alone. one of the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. >> the taliban steals food. i'm very poor. if i protest, they say you support nato. >> this is what progress lookalike in afghanistan. so much so, there is to be a further cut in british troops with a few hundred soldiers. but native
the british people deserve a deadline. we have been in helmand province since 2006, in afghanistan since early 2001. i believe the afghan government, the afghan people, the afghan army deserve to have a deadline so they can plan properly towards a transition. >> so, it is over to the afghan forces. in the village, the police seem willing to help themselves to food, just like the taliban. we did find the taliban ammunitions-in a melon patch -- ammunition stash in a melon patch. the soldiers have not gone away. they were sniping on a mission that we joined. there is still a big problem with corruption. the question now, will the afghans be able to do the job the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> for more on these challenges and calls for an even quicker drawdown of u.s. troops, i spoke earlier with a former adviser to the u.s. military in afghanistan. so, seth, have david cameron asking the taliban to stop fighting, put down their weapons, join the political process. what do you think the chances are that might happen? >> there are elements of the taliban and other insu
afghanistan today. four nato troops were killed in bombings in the east and south. and, eleven afghan policemenç died in separate attacks. amid the killings, general david petraeus-- commander of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan-- handed over his duties. he is leaving to lead the central intelligence agency. his replacement is u.s. marine corps general john allen. >> it is my intention to maintain the momentum of this campaign, this great campaign on which we have embarked. i will continue to support in every way possible, the recruiting, the training, preparation and equipping and the fielding and the employment of the afghaf oational security forces.ç >> sreenivasan: allen's tenure began just a day after taliban insurgents claimed another high- profile assassination. a close aide to afghan president hamid karzai was killed sunday in a gunbattle at his home in kabul. it followed the murder of karzai's half-brother last week. for more on afghanistan we turn to pam constable, who covers south asia for the "washington post." pam, thanks for being with us. the series of high prof
. this is obviously a norwegian man. previous speculation were more surrounding that norway is involved in afghanistan and libya at the moment, but we do not know whether this has anything to do with these incidents today. this was the labor party youth camp that is held on the island every year. the prime minister is the head of the labor party here in norway. it seemed very targeted toward the government and toward maybe the party -- that party especially, without knowing exactly why that party has been targeted. >> thank you. and for more on who may have been behind this -- these attacks, you can -- let's go to frank gardner in london. what is your analysis based on the information we have so far? >> i have to say the right now it is looking more like a timothy mcveigh style attack. the mayor also told us a short while ago that the same person carried out the bombing in central oslo and then two hours later the shooting spree on the island. the distance is only about 3445 minutes. the attacks were separated by two hours -- only about 30 to 45 minutes. the attacks were separated by two hours. the ch
of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: this was a deadly day for nato forces in afghanistan. the alliance announced four troops were killed in two separate attacks in the east. there was no immediate word on their nationalities. 280 nato service members have died in afghanistan so far this year. in syria, security forces and allied gunmen shot and killed 11 people in hama, where residents openly defied the regime of bashar al-assad. activists reported hundreds of people burned tires and erected makeshift barriers to block troops and tanks now encircling the city. in washington, state department spokesman victoria nuland said it is the latest evidence that syria is using "intimidation and arrest" to erase all opposition. >> a week ago the positive example of a city in syria where peaceful demonstrations were allowed, where people were meeting each other and organizing and talking. today we see the town surrounded by syrian security forces so we're going in the wrong direction. >> sreenivasan: in 1982, then- president hafez assad, the current leader's father, crushed a rebelli
at bay. now, to afghanistan where five people were killed today in a blast inside a mosque. the attack was carried out by a man who hit explosives in his turban. it happened in kandahar during a memorial service to president karzai's brother was assassinated this week. for more of the president brothers and the governor were in kandahar. >> another deadly attack in the heart of kandahar. top afghan officials were attending a prayer service for the president's half brother when the bomber struck. elite police units secured the area. among the dead, an influential cleric. a man opposed to the taliban. like so many other tax, the brunt of it was borne by ordinary afghans. more people are also dying from nato air strikes. late on wednesday, six villages were attacked among the victims, women and children. it led to a wave of anger. protests have taken place pressing for the withdrawal of western forces. that is about to happen imminently. some are wondering, at what cost? starting next week and over the next several months, thousands of nato troops have begun to a withdrawal. handing over
sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the mayor of kandahar was assassinated in southern afghanistan today. a suicide bomber hid explosives in his turban, before blowing himself up inside a heavily-fortified government compound. it's the third taliban attack on an afghan powerbroker in the south in more than two weeks. the new u.s. ambassador to afghanistan ryan crocker said it's proof the taliban is so damaged, it can't carry out large-scale operations. he spoke today in kabul. >> they've had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do and, in some cases, that has been assassination. we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. clearly, these are horrific attacks but they can also be interpreted as a sign of significant organizational weakness. >> sreenivasan: a taliban spokesman told the associated press the kandahar mayor was targeted for ordering the destruction of homes city officials claimed were illegally constructed. two children were killed during that demolition. the prime minister of norway today announced an independent commission will review how last week's twin attacks were allowed to
in afghanistan reached 64 today-- most of them americans-- with two more soldiers killed in the south. and 20 afghan civilians died when a roadside bomb blew up the bus they were riding. meanwhile, the coalition said tuesday's deadly attack on a kabul hotel was the work of the haqqani network. the group has ties to al-qaeda and the taliban. a leader of that network was killed in a nato air strike last night. defense secretary robert gates got a ceremonial send-off his last day on the job. president obama and the outgoing joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen joined hundreds of others on the parade ground outside the pentagon, to mark the occasion. the president awarded gates the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. and the secretary joked it had been a secret to rival the raid on osama bin laden. >> i'm deeply honored and moved by your presentation of this award. it is a big surprise, but we should have known a couple of months ago, you're getting pretty good at this covert ops stuff. ( laughter ) >> sreenivasan: gates served four and a half years as defense secretary, s
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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